13. Inertia triggered attachment for collect

How an Inertia triggered attachment collects parts. Demo with Luly Box Robot from LEGO Education SPIKE Prime

Inertia triggered attachments does no require the use of a motor. Let the inertia do all the work. These kinds of attachments are very useful at robotics competitions like FIRST LEGO League and World Robot Olympiad. The robot moves, the attachment falls and grabs the ball. The attachment uses Luly, a small LEGO Education SPIKE Prime competition robot with 3D building instructions as a robot base.

Luly, small LEGO Education SPIKE Prime competition robot with 3D building instructions

Luly is a new STEAM competition robot from LEGO Education SPIKE Prime. We would use in some of the courses. It's simple, it requires a really small number of parts and we can demonstrate most of the attachments and programs with it. Check out the courses below and see how Luly is used to complete in a competition.

Inertia triggered falling attachment from LEGO Education SPIKE Prime, with 3D building instructions

This is an attachment trigger from the robot inertial. It's built with LEGO Education SPIKE Prime parts and it demonstrates how to move with the robot, stop, the attachment activates and it collects a few parts. The goal of the attachment is to collect parts from the field without the use of any motors. It is an easy and quick way to build an attachment for FIRST LEGO League/World Robotics Olympiad and other robotics competition. The principle is the same. The attachment is designed for Luly, small LEGO Education SPIKE Prime competition robot with 3D building instructions

Scratch (Word Blocks) program to move forward and return with LEGO Education SPIKE Prime

This program makes the robot move forwards and than backwards using LEGO Education SPIKE App Word Blocks.

Python program to move forward and return with LEGO Education SPIKE Prime

This program makes the robot move forwards and then backwards using LEGO Education SPIKE App Python.

from spike import PrimeHub, LightMatrix, Button, StatusLight, ForceSensor, MotionSensor, Speaker, ColorSensor, App, DistanceSensor, Motor, MotorPair
from spike.control import wait_for_seconds, wait_until, Timer
from math import *

hub = PrimeHub() 

motor_pair = MotorPair('A', 'B') # Set the motor ports in the motor_pair.
motor_pair.set_default_speed(50) # Set the default speed of the the motor_pair.
motor_pair.set_motor_rotation(17.6, 'cm') # Set the distance that the robot travel for one rotation of its wheels. The value 17.6 comes from
                                          # the diameter of the wheel (5.6cm) multiplied by "¤Ç" (3.14).

motor_pair.move(40,'cm', 0, 50) # Start moving for 40cm with NO Steering '0' with 50% speed.
motor_pair.move(40,'cm', 0, -50) # Start moving backward for 40cm with NO Steering '0' with 50% speed. -50 for speed means: rotate with 50% seed backward.

raise SystemExit # Close the program.

Quick Pinless Attachments for LEGO EV3 Competition Robots (Part 2)

If you think that the quick pinless attachments shown in video 63 are quick enough, see this tutorial and you will find out that the quick pinless attachments could be even quicker. These attachments can work without motors but by using the inertia forces.

This tutorial shows the logic of creating quick pinless attachments which do not have any moving parts. This facilitates their placement and is the key to the quicker change of attachments on the LEGO Mindstorms robot construction.

There is a short description of how the attachments work; how the inertia forces affect the robot parts and what causes these inertia forces. The tutorial once again focuses on the building process of the quick pinless construction base, the attachment and the adaptor.

Try to use this type of quick pinless attachments and see how many new opportunities it will give you. Share with us your comments and ideas.